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Stoop Stories

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Stoop Story 05: Pete Costanti

The Architect’s Wife has always been focused internally on showcasing our showroom space and the artists, creators, or makers within it. But given the current circumstances, we’re learning to shift our focus and connect with people in new ways. More importantly, we want to shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community. In this series which we’ve dubbed “Stoop Stories”, The Architect’s Wife visits friends and makers to share how they’re staying in/spired.

Let us introduce you to Pete Costanti –  the founder of MFGR who whole heartedly believes in providing a space that encourages employees to explore their creative pursuits while collectively giving a voice to modern mountain design. MFGR is not bound to the traditional rules of design, but operate in a world where art, architecture, furniture and fabrication intersect. The MFGR team works under the north-star of a phrase “LEGOs. Not EGOs” – a multi faceted reminder to let go of that ridged state of wanting control and remembering you are part of a larger system bigger than yourself. Focus on how best to make a contribution and continue building up. Their distinct style can be found all over the Bozeman, MT from public park bridges, music venues, and likely the chairs where you park it to enjoy your favorite cup of coffee or baked good.

Below we visit with Pete from the stoop of his airtstream [just one installment from his backyard pandemic project]. One can see the diverse representation of Pete’s work from his backyard alone. Thank you Pete for greeting us with a warm “yoohoo” and giving us a tour of the grounds.

Yoohoo

Tell us what you do. How did you fall into your craft?

Furniture and architectural design. I used to landscape in the summers so I could ski all winter. While working on this beautiful house I had a lightning bolt moment that I wanted to design houses and everything related to them. I went down to MSU the following day and signed up and was in school just weeks later.

What was your first ever job?

Picking strawberries for a farm in Washington. I think I made about $12 in two months and ate a lot of strawberries. Lot’s of strawberry fights too. Now I have my own little strawberry field growing for myself.

What have you been up to during quarantine?M

[At home] Projects around the house. Building a chicken coop “Mar del Pollo”. We have a lot of chickens – Pecker1, Pecker2, Gaga, Bradley, Lucy – named after Abby’s [The Architect’s Wife pup] Lucy. We’ve also been building our garden and fences.

[At work] Trying to take care of my employees. Solidify work. Design a few things. Helped finish a super cool house with Korean architect Byoungsoo Cho.

What’s something you’ve been working on your excited about?

Dickerson House with Byoung [stairwell pictured above]. I’m starting to do more building and general contracting and really loving it. Some really cool projects coming up from MFGR.

Did the pandemic change the way MFGR operates?

We closed early – about two weeks before the mandated closure and everyone just worked from home. Last week was our first week back and we’re doing our best to be responsible.

It’s a unique situation because it’s a very collaborative form of work. The whole model of the business from the very beginning is that we work together – when the designers need to talk to the designers – we’re a door away. It was complicated for a bit and it still is because it’s a bumping shoulders type of work. We’re wiping everything down and keeping our distance. But what I think more than anything and I keep reminding everyone is that it’s not what we do in here, it’s what we do outside of here. If you’re not going to be responsible outside [of your workspace], you’re going to screw it up for all of us. Just be careful and be thoughtful.

What’s something one might not know about you?

This big guy just turned into a runner. I decided I needed the challenge and I signed up for the Bozeman Marathon. Who knows what’s going to happen, but I’ve stuck to it. I’ve been running ~40 miles/month. I ran a 7.08 minute split this morning which was crazy. I could barely breathe. I almost died I think. But I made it and now I’m going to figure out how to run a marathon.

Tell us about your little family

Leo is amazing. He’s made me really proud in the last week because he started laughing at his own farts. That makes me really happy. He’s been the dose of perspective I could ever have – he loves to laugh and loves to be around everyone. He’s showing me what life’s all about.

Kait is my force-to-be-wreckin’-with wife who is my ally, my sounding board, my partner, and my everything. She’s amazing because we’re both very diverse in what we do – she’s a wedding planner, very exceptional in the fashion world, understands home goods and interior design.

Favorite Mexican in Bozeman?

It’s a two-way tie: Fiesta Mexicana and Los Jarochos truck.


Anything else you’d like to share?

MFGR Designs / @mfgr_designs


The Architect’s Wife is focused on sharing togetherness, inspired spaces, and warmth in any capacity we can generate it. Here we shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community.


Stoop Stories

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Stoop Story 04: Ole Nelson

The Architect’s Wife has always been focused internally on showcasing our showroom space and the artists, creators, or makers within it. But given the current circumstances, we’re learning to shift our focus and connect with people in new ways. More importantly, we want to shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community. In this series which we’ve dubbed “Stoop Stories”, The Architect’s Wife visits friends and makers to share how they’re staying in/spired.

Let us introduce you to Ole Nelson – a maker, builder, artist and humourist. He operates out of an unsuspecting sign warehouse near downtown Bozeman, Montana. Ole’s process involves everything from freehand drawing, digitizing images, meticulously measuring, cutting on a behemoth plasma table, and finally, assembling and welding pieces together. The majority of his work falls into sign making and large-scale sculptures. A lesser known fact: Ole designed the original logos for Bozeman Brewing Company (a beloved staple for many local Bozmanites). Exploring Ole’s space and exchanging stories from the stoop was quite a delight. We hope Ole generates some curiosity and encourages you to follow your creative pursuits – no matter the medium, the scale, or how daunting the process may be.

Tell us what you do. How did you fall into your craft?

Over the past 25 years I have designed and built a wide variety of art, signs, furniture, lighting, and sculpture. The bulk of these projects over the years have been signs and sign related artwork. My passion over the last decade has been on sculpture and large scale sign projects. I moved from Wisconsin to Bozeman to attend MSU and study graphic design with an emphasis on sculpture. While finishing my last year of college, a friend and I purchased an existing sign shop on the north side and thus began my career as a commercial artist.

What was your first ever job?

My first job in middle school was working for a small apple orchard that was a mile from where I grew up.

What have you been up to during quarantine?

My overall day to day has not changed that much, other than the bulk of projects I was working on and bidding where very effected by the shutdown and most have taken a pause in their projects. I have been spending more time on the computer than usual, learning some new design programs and brushing up on my Illustrator and Photoshop skills to make my project proposals much more photo-realistic. I have also been perfecting my new skills as a “shed-farmer”

What’s something you’ve been working on your excited about?

In the works now are some exciting projects for the new Armory Hotel and the related Armory Music Hall. Also I am working on the approved historic Ellen blade sign and hope that they will be able to open in some way in the near future.

What’s something one might not know about you?

Well, I have a mean pickleball serve

Where do you find inspiration?

I would say that I find the most inspiration from following my curiosity. I have always been fascinated with hidden energy of people, places and things. This “hidden” energy has influenced my process as an artist and it comes through in how my sculptures are conveyed to the public. This can show up in the form of motion from a static image, softness from a hard steel shape, and the motion and gesture that began as a simple black and white sketch. A sculpted piece in not finished until I have put all of my energy into it, so that I am depleted, like I have transferred all that energy into the piece itself.

Anything else you’d like to share?

I would say that over the years the thing that has had the biggest impact on my creative pursuits would be that I have been fortunate to have had projects and people that have really pushed my comfort level. Building the biggest sign project followed by the largest sculpture I have ever built in the same year has given the confidence to feel comfortable with large scale public art.

On another note: AW is happy to report that thanks to an anonymous tip the iconic Starlite sign has been returned to it’s home and is safe with Ole as its steward. See full story here.

Media Station / @ole.nelson


The Architect’s Wife is focused on sharing togetherness, inspired spaces, and warmth in any capacity we can generate it. Here we shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community.


Employee Q&A: Chloe Miles

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Inside the Montana Motor Supply building – tucked unsuspectingly behind main street in downtown Bozeman, Montana – you’ll find Abby Hetherington and her team. This team consists of designers, saleswomen, operators, project managers, stylists, a token illustrator, a Paul Bunyanesque character that lends muscles to hoist furniture and arrange the showroom floor, amongst others that contribute their unique talents, skills and craft.

For those new to following, Abby Hetherington Interiors (AHI) is housed with its sister company, the Architect’s Wife (AW). Think of AHI as the back of house designers while AW is the the front of house curators.

Here, we share some of the faces behind AHI & AW along with a bit of their backstory. Let us introduce you to one of our most thoughtful and bold designers – Chloe Miles.

How did you land at AHI/AW?

I moved here from Northern California last spring. AHI drew me in with two distinct qualities: the rad people and the willingness to be bold in design.

What is your role?

My role at AHI is to take design concepts and develop them into drawings that can be built. Trusting the design process is essential to what I do — through collaboration and revision thoughtful design happens.

Where do you find design inspiration?

Nature is my number one inspiration – color, texture, and light are seemingly perfect in their natural state. The abundance of differentiating landscapes provide endless inspiration. Well-balanced interiors inspire me — Wabi-Sabi paired with clean modern forms is everything!

What was your first job?

Working at my cousins Farm/Feed store.

What’s your guilty pleasure song?

What have you been up to during quarantine?

Gardening while listening to music.

If you were to pick two things to take home with you today from the Architect’s Wife showroom, what would they be?

A Kelly Wearstler furniture piece and a good puzzle!

We 🖤you Chloe Miles

Stoop Stories

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Stoop Story 03: Fish Fisher

The Architect’s Wife has always been focused internally on showcasing our showroom space and the artists, creators, or makers within it. But given the current circumstances, we’re learning to shift our focus and connect with people in new ways. More importantly, we want to shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community. In this series which we’ve dubbed “Stoop Stories”, The Architect’s Wife visits friends and makers to share how they’re staying in/spired.

Let us introduce you to Fish Fisher – an avid outdoorsman with over 30 years experience creating functional antler art. Fish’s Antler Art has become a family business with his oldest son Riley working along side him from his shop in Bozeman, Montana. All of Fish’s pieces use genuine antlers which have been shed by moose, elk, fallow deer, red deer, whitetail and mule deer and caribou. Over the years, Fish has created various antler chandeliers for The Architect’s Wife.

How did you end up in Montana?

I was originally a Wisconsin farm boy. I graduated in 1980 and then hitch hiked around the world. When I found Montana in 1985, I knew it was my place and never left.

Tell us what you do. How did you fall into your craft?

Lots of mediums – I carve, weld, wood work, but antler art is my passion! I especially enjoy making antler chandeliers. Functional art.

What’s your process?

March, April, May are big antler months. I’ll have guys [hunters] bring in their antlers and I’ll either buy, sell, or trade depending on what I need for crafts. I’m always organizing the antlers that I have by lefts or rights, by size, or grade. To make a very good product, you need to have a lot to pick from. 

Tell us about a favorite project you’ve done.

People come to visit Montana and want a piece of Montana back in their home wherever that may be. We [Fish and his son Riley] built a big 7′ x 7′ chandelier for folks in the Philippines. So, we built it, took a photo of it, broke it down and took it all apart, put it in two big containers, shipped it over there, flew ourselves over there to assemble it right in their place. Then we said ‘thanks’ and took off to an island to explore. We rented motorcycles, just my boy and I, and went through the country.

What was your first ever job?

I carved an eagle head on a moose antler in 1990. Every one is numbered. I’m now on #170.

What have you been up to during quarantine?

Antler hunting [a great social distancing activity] and creating NEW designs!

What’s something you’ve been working on your excited about?

Very wild looking caribou chandelier. Free flowing! New style of light sockets and bulbs.

What’s something one might not know about you?

I sell a lot of taxidermy mounts also: moose, elk , mountain lions, mountain goats, buffalo, bear, bighorn sheep, bison rugs, bear rugs, mountain lion rugs, etc.. 

Anything else you’d like to share?

Always serve the client better than anyone else is! Love what you’re doing and you’ll never have to work for a living because it will never feel like work.

Fish’s Antler Art   /  @fishsantlerart


The Architect’s Wife is focused on sharing togetherness, inspired spaces, and warmth in any capacity we can generate it. Here we shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community.


Employee Q&A: Shayne Bryan

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Inside the Montana Motor Supply building – tucked unsuspectingly behind main street in downtown Bozeman, Montana – you’ll find Abby Hetherington and her team. This team consists of designers, saleswomen, operators, project managers, stylists, a token illustrator, a Paul Bunyanesque character that lends muscles to hoist furniture and arrange the showroom floor, amongst others that contribute their unique talents, skills and craft.

For those new to following, Abby Hetherington Interiors (AHI) is housed with its sister company, the Architect’s Wife (AW). Think of AHI as the back of house designers while AW is the the front of house curators.

Here, we share some of the faces behind AHI & AW along with a bit of their backstory. Let us introduce you to creative powerhouse, anecdotal candle hoarder and Junior Designer, Shayne Bryan.

How did you land at AHI/AW?

I began my journey at AHI while still in school for design at MSUs Gallatin College. I joined the team as an intern in 2017 to gain as much knowledge and experience as I could in the field before graduating. Before I even knew there was an interior design firm operating under the same roof, I would often come into the Architects Wife just walk around the showroom to check out the unique antiques mixed with the modern furniture, lighting and contemporary art. AHI’s ability to blend so many different styles, materials, patterns, and textures, and yet still remain so refined and sophisticated inspired me to be part of a team that is not afraid to be different.

What is your role?

After graduating in May of 2019, I transitioned into a junior designer role with AHI, stoked to say the least! As a junior designer I work closely with the senior designers and design architect to create schematic designs, concepts, and presentations for clients. Working daily in AutoCAD, Revit, and Sketchup producing models and drawings illustrating the collectively creative and unique ideas coming from the back quarters of the old Montana motor supply building.

What was your first job?

Cleaning for my dads Architecture office every weekend during high school.

Favorite book of all time?

The Modern A-Frame… because I dream of having my own tucked away in the woods someday!!

What’s your guilty pleasure song?

Metallica – Sad But True.

What’s something one might not know about you?

I use to be a music promoter in Missoula, MT and ran two music venues. I love music and the joy that all genres bring to each person individually and is still a huge passion of mine.

If you could have a dinner with someone who is alive or dead, who would it be and why?

My grandma Vicky. I never got to meet her, but from what I’ve heard, she was one rad lady!

What have you been up to during quarantine?

My family and I just moved into a new house… so it’s been weekends full of never ending punch lists, along with a good dose of running and golfing to get outside!

Where do you find inspiration?

I love browsing estliving.com for inspo!

If you were to pick two things to take home with you today from the Architect’s Wife showroom, what would they be?

I’ve had my eye on this black miniforms table with white marble pebbles. A good black and white contrast will always be my first love. I’m known to take home an anecdotal candle about every month too.

We 🖤you Shayne Bryan

Stoop Stories

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Stoop Story 02: Montana Picker

The Architect’s Wife has always been focused internally on showcasing our showroom space and the artists, creators, or makers within it. But given the current circumstances, we’re learning to shift our focus and connect with people in new ways. More importantly, we want to shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community. In this series which we’ve dubbed “Stoop Stories”, The Architect’s Wife visits friends and makers to share how they’re staying in/spired.

David Perlstein, also known as Montana Picker, is an avid collector of all things Montana history. He specializes in Advertising and Americana but can share the history of just about any artifact. From early photographs, maps, books, documents, bottles, tokens, political posters and badges, labels, industrial pieces, breweriana, postcards, execution notices, to different territories around Montana – Dave is a fountain of knowledge.

As a friend of The Architect’s Wife, Dave has contributed to many projects – sourcing statement pieces or perhaps providing a final piece to the puzzle. We took a day touring his home in downtown Bozeman, Montana where he shared the stories and history behind his found treasures. We hope Dave will ignite some curiosity in you or perhaps serve as a reminder to look at things a bit closer next time, consider it’s history, and preserve the quality that makes it valuable – if not for you, someone else.

[opens door]

“Welcome to my pandemic problem. When you walk into my home, it’s not a River Runs Through It, it’s more of a Disaster Runs Through It, but it’s my variation of Montana history”. 

Tell us how it all began… 

My world has been a strange journey of collecting and history. I started collecting baseball cards. My Grandmother was a collector. I liked a lot of contemporary and folk art. I used to explore Chicago and noticed outsider art picking up. I have a history degree and transitioning from being a Chicago boy to a Bozeman boy with a love for history – history of people or the history of the people that collected these items.

There are items here that are amazing to me. Then there are items that are amazing to me because of where they came from, who collected them, and that I was allowed to be the next steward of it – sort of bestowed to me with the idea to not let it go to the junk pile.

How did you land the name Montana Picker?

People always kept asking me “Hey, are you like that show American Pickers [on the History channel]?” In crafting my name Montana Picker, I used to be just ‘Dave’ and I told people I ‘junk’. I think they might have expected ‘Sanford and Son’. I kept hearing this name so I sort of picked it up. It’s a decent name I’m more in collections and in touch with museums and universities. The picker name for better or for worse is something people understand. I don’t pull up in a sprinter van or a trunk and schlep things away though.

Whose you’re clientele?

I have an eclectic collection and deal with so many different collectors – I deal with people that only collect brewery history, only collect neons, only collect cans, only collect photographs, only collect bottles… So I can go into everyones collection, know something about what they collect and know who collects it. It’s a bit of a horse-trading game, but the neat part is having that avenue of having the Architect’s Wife and being now able to see an item in it’s home (instead of seeing the bland things that you can buy online or on eBay). Clients are actually receiving historical Montana artifacts and they look amazing. And to me, not only does it make me feel really great about seeing this stuff stay alive, it’s about adding great character to a home. 

What do you find special?

It’s amazing what resonates with different people. Not everything I have is Montana theme –I like having weirder, factional pieces from a collective standpoint. 

When someone presents me with something, they’re giving me a story and I like to open that story up. They story is what’s really special to me. I also really like old folk art advertising. And sometimes it’s just a treasure hunt.

Signs specifically. Each sign is it’s own tale – it’s a reflection of where I was, who I was with, my relationship to that person – and that’s what I think is really neat. I can see friends or people that did this before me and hear why they saved it and how got it from point A to point B.

What is your end goal with all of your pieces?

The goal would be to find other stewards. You hope that it gets loved and shared. You can’t keep everything – right? So what I’ve learned with Abby is that the design world is an incredible opportunity for me to find things, keep them salvageable, and Abby can make them interesting and unique. Abby has helped me enter this new world of appreciating being able to find things and pass them on in that sense. It also allows me to keep getting bigger and better things.

It’s amazing to reach out to the tight-knit community [of collectors] that I have and to be able to say “Hey look, it’s restored, it’s home and it’s alive again”. It’s a neat story.

If you had to pick only one treasure from your wall to keep – which one would it be?

Everything about Montana history is captured here on this whiskey label. Booze. Water. Mountains. Mining. The Railroad. The State Capital in Helena. And it’s all here on a label. So much on so little on the teeny little label. 

What have you been up to during quarantine?

Too much social media, though it has been great for education and meeting new folks around the state that collect or are interested to share memories and historical items they own. I’ve also used this time to seek out items specific for AW projects.

What’s something you’ve been working on your excited about?

A remodel of my space with Abby to make it the most interesting way to display and show my collection. Especially to keep me excited.

If you could have someone else’s voice, whose would it be?

Anything else you’d like to share?

Patience and honesty.

Montana Picker / @montanapicker


The Architect’s Wife is focused on sharing togetherness, inspired spaces, and warmth in any capacity we can generate it. Here we shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community.


Employee Q&A: Allison Frederick

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Inside the Montana Motor Supply building – tucked unsuspectingly behind main street in downtown Bozeman, Montana – you’ll find Abby Hetherington and her team. This team consists of designers, saleswomen, operators, project managers, stylists, a token illustrator, a Paul Bunyanesque character that lends muscles to hoist furniture and arrange the showroom floor, amongst others that contribute their unique talents, skills and craft.

For those new to following, Abby Hetherington Interiors (AHI) is housed with its sister company, the Architect’s Wife (AW). Think of AHI as the back of house designers while AW is the the front of house curators.

Here, we share some of the faces behind AHI & AW along with a bit of their backstory. Let us introduce you to Golden Girls puzzle aficionado and Senior Designer, Allison Frederick.

How did you land at AHI/AW?

I moved up to Bozeman from Jackson, WY to join this amazing team! I had visited AW when I was visiting friends, and was so impressed with the quality, the curation, and sense of whimsy involved in the shop. I started following Abby’s design work and was inspired; I knew I would be joining a powerhouse team. I managed the shop and purchased for the store, before moving full time to the firm. I still like to keep my toe in the store side, and am currently the point of contact for the AW designer trade program. 

What is your role?

Lead designer; no two days are the same! Design involves a lot more spreadsheets than many people imagine. I would say 50% is staying organized, and the other half involves site visits, client meetings (LOTS of time on Zoom these days), and actual design. Our projects swing from architecturally heavy design – floor plans, beam placement, selecting interior finishes, exterior siding, flooring, tile etc, to the softer design – lighting, furniture fabrics. It’s always nice when I have a few projects in different phases so I can have a balance of both to my day. 

Where do you find design inspiration?

I’m a sucker for print media; I am old school and still have cork boards galore. AD and Dwell in my mailbox make for a great day. We also are lucky enough to (normally) travel to trade shows. Seeing the amazing new furniture and lighting designers that pop up at ICFF always gets the inspiration flowing.

What was your first job?

My first full time job (besides babysitting, filing, yard work) was when I was 16 and worked at The Flying Tomato. It was a grocery delivery service; the clientele was primarily tourists staying in some of Jackson Wyomings most amazing rentals. I would get to see these amazing kitchens when I was putting groceries away, and my awareness of great space planning developed. It was so fun to have such an insider look at all of these amazing private residences.

Favorite book of all time?

Sometimes A Great Notion, Ken Kesey

What’s your guilty pleasure song?

Good As Hell – I know its basic b*tch, but dammit, I love Lizzo.

What’s something one might not know about you?

Quarantine has taught me that I just don’t like to cook. It feels like something shameful in this day where chefs are celebrities, everyone would love to cook more if they had the time…turns out, I wouldn’t love it. Ironically, I do love watching cooking shows.

If you could have a dinner with someone who is alive or dead, who would it be and why?

Tina Fey – How could that not be a good time?

What have you been up to during quarantine?

Thankfully, I’m a pretty good hermit. Reading a lot, running, and just finished the Golden Girls puzzle from AW. Yea, its getting pretty wild in my house.

If you were to pick two things to take home with you today from the Architect’s Wife showroom, what would they be?

The moss green New York Chair from Saba Italia, hands down. The Terrazzo candles to put all over my house.

We 🖤you Allison Frederick

Make Mom’s Day.

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AW Mother’s Day Gift Guide

We bring you a handful of shop picks to make all the women in your life feel extra special. Whether she’s a funky Funky Artista, a Daydreamer, a Foodie, or a Mountain Mama –The Architect’s Wife has a find for every style of personality. Here’s to all the mother figures out there. Happy Mother’s Day from AW!

👩‍🎤 The Funky Artista

Shop The Funky Artista: Terrazzo Rectangle Tray, Olive Wood Nesting Bowls, Life of the Party Puzzle, Nudie Pillow, Bob Ross coloring book

✨ The Daydreamer

Shop The Daydreamer: Pink Beach notebook, Yogi notebook, Pastel Doorway notebook, Balsam Noir candle, XOXO XL statement matches, Calhoune & Co. tea towels.

👩‍🍳 The Foodie

Shop The Foodie:  The Skillful Forager book, Little Puzzles Things –Broccoli, Forbidden Fruit Pieces Puzzle.

🏔 The Mountain Mama

Shop Mountain Mama: Camp book, Fern and Moss Minimalist candle, Mountains and River Boats tea towel.

Stoop Stories

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Stoop Story 01: Labellum

The Architect’s Wife has always been focused internally on showcasing our showroom space and the artists, creators, or makers within it. But given the current circumstances, we’re learning to shift our focus and connect with people in new ways. More importantly, we want to shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community. In this series which we’ve dubbed “Stoop Stories”, The Architect’s Wife visits friends and makers to share how they’re staying in/spired.

Remy is the owner of Labellum – a contemporary flower boutique – as well as an urban farmer, beekeeper, and all around swiss army knife of a creative. We enjoyed getting to know Remy from the stoop of her greenhouse and hearing her perspective on change and growth (both literally and figuratively). If anything, we hope to share a dose of her radiant positivity with you.

Tell us what you do. How did you fall into your craft?

After college I needed a job, and I saw a Want Ad in the newspaper from a local flower shop. I applied that day and was hired on the spot. I was that little kid out foraging on the sidewalk for dropped leaves and little twigs to decorate the Thanksgiving table. It seemed quite natural. I didn’t seek it out, it found me.

What was your first ever job?

My first ever job was when I was 8. Cat sitting for neighbors when they went out of town. They paid me in Lisa Frank stickers. They were dropped off to me in a brown paper lunch bag when they returned home. It was perfection.

What does an average routine day look like for you?

Thankfully, no day is the same. Once I am at the my shop every day is different. There is always a new occasion to be designing for, a birthday, an anniversary, styled shoot & and lots of weddings to plan. Some days it’s more computer and administrative details to handle. You have to wear many hats when running a small business.

What have you been up to during quarantine?

This stay at home time has been intense, but as creatives we always have 20 million projects we are working on at the same time. Outside of work, we have a micro urban farm at our house. It mostly has given us the opportunity and a jump start on all of our Spring getting ready chores. Cleaned up the raised beds, playing in the dirt, checked on our bees. My dog is super happy to have me home all day. We got 3 new chicks, and I have been baking more than I usually do.

What’s something you’ve been working on your excited about?

We are creating more areas to grow flowers in this year. We usually grow mostly food for our family, friends and neighbors. so, I’m super excited to offer even more fresh, local, slow flowers to our customers. And to provide lots of yummy flower foods for the pollinators.

What’s something one might not know about you?

Music is my soul. My husband and I started a group many moons ago. We recorded 4 albums, had some fun in Los Angeles with soundtracks and radio play. I sing all day long, and our customers walk in on me singing all the time.

Currently playing on the record player (not including cd player or Pandora):

Where do you find inspiration?

Inspiration as a creator isn’t tangible. It comes from every bit of the world we live in and beyond. One never knows when it appears. With flowers, they speak to you if you listen. And I don’t mean literally, but they tell you what to do. Each stem is different, has it’s on variation of size and color. Each stem bends its own direction and decides how far to open. Every season gives us different colors and textures, so you never have the chance to get stuck doing the same thing. Change is quite inspiring too.

Labellum / @labellumflowers


The Architect’s Wife is focused on sharing togetherness, inspired spaces, and warmth in any capacity we can generate it. Here we shine a light on craftspeople and the creativity they contribute to our community.


The AW Guide to Staying In/spired: A Quarantine Care Package [The Essentials]

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Hello from our distributed homes. If we’re honest, it sure has been a new challenge adjusting to operating in this new normal. Nonetheless, we’re all in this together – each of us experiencing something very similar in our own worlds and learning to engage in new ways. Despite the current unknowns out there, the Architect’s Wife is focused on sharing togetherness, inspired spaces, and warmth in any capacity we can generate it. 

So the new norm is staying in. We’re right there with you. Luckily, The Architect’s Wife knows of a few certain comforts to remind you what makes a home and is here to share new ways of staying in/spired. Today, we’re sharing an array of essentials to create a Quarantine Care Package. Whether it’s to treat yourself and your space or send someone a warm reminder you care about ‘em, it’s a sure way to life the spirits. Below are a handful of suggestions but the combo options are many.

Available destination scents: Brooklyn, Kyoto, Catskills, Santorini, SantaFe, Italia and Tuileries

A scent has the power to transform a home into something, someplace entirely different: whether its the past, the outdoors or the headspace to dream about the future. At a time where we have to do a little daydreaming to travel beyond trips from the couch to the refrigerator and back, The Escapist Collection by Brooklyn Candle Studio will take you to our favorite destinations in the world.

Pictured Books: Cabin Style and Rustic Modern by Chase Reynolds Ewald, Living in Style Mountain Chalets by Gisela Rich, and Mountains: Beyond the Clouds by Tim Hall

 These coffee table-worthy books are a source of inspiration for renovations or new construction; an armchair escape for those who love living in nature; and the perfect gift for anyone dreaming of a cabin home or simply in the mountains and above the clouds. Read up on interviews with architects, designers, builders and owners who illuminate both the backstory and the creative process of their work. Whether a bison ranch, a log fishing cabin, a stone guest house, a lakeside retreat, a ski chalet, or a wine country barn, cabin style manifests in whimsical, playful, comfortable, and welcoming interiors and architecture ― always inspired by the land.

Pictured Throws: Rainbow, Good at Naps, Eat Poop Sleep, Mi Casa Es Su Casa, Cozy as a Cactus, and Gems & Crystals

These blankets by Calhoun & Co are designed and created from illustrations by founder Kerry Stokes. In addition to the utilitarian purpose of keeping one warm, these blankets will bring some personality to any room and smiles to the face. These throws make for great wall hangings as well!

Take a break. For off-screen time, meditating on color, and stimulating the mind. Our showroom shelves are overflowing with classic games, puzzles and toys for all ages that will endure generations of play. When not being played, the unique designs of each game translates to the perfect shelf accessory.

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